NYTimes article on parental monitoring cites me, friends

‘Big Brother’? No, It’s Parents
By SOMINI SENGUPTA
Published: June 25, 2012 253 Comments

When her children were ready to have laptops of their own, Jill Ross bought software that would keep an eye on where they went online. One day it offered her a real surprise. She discovered that her 16-year-old daughter had set up her own video channel.

Using the camera on her laptop, sometimes in her bedroom, she and a friend were recording mundane teenage banter and broadcasting it on YouTube for the whole world to see.

For Ms. Ross, who lives outside Denver, it was a window into her daughter’s mind and an emblem of the strange new hurdles of modern-day parenting. She did not mention it to her daughter; she just subscribed to the channel’s updates. The daughter said nothing either; she just let Mom keep watching.

“It’s a matter of knowing your kids,” Ms. Ross said of her discovery.

Parents can now use an array of tools to keep up with the digital lives of their children, raising new quandaries. Is surveillance the best way to protect children? Or should parents trust them to share if they are scared or bewildered by something online? Read More

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About Lynn Schofield Clark

I'm an author and media professor who researches and writes about how digital and mobile media are changing the lives of diverse U.S. young people and their families. Regina Marchi and I have recently coauthored Young People and the Future of News: Social Media and the Rise of Connective Journalism for Cambridge University Press (2017). It's about how the definitions of news are changing as young people use social media in their relationships with (and sometimes in advocacy for) their communities of concern (their neighborhoods, schools, workplaces, etc.). My earlier books are Parenting in a Digital Age, published by Oxford University Press in 2013; From Angels to Aliens: Teenagers, the Media, and the Supernatural, published by Oxford University Press in 2005; and Media, Home and Family, co-authored with Diane Alters, Stewart Hoover, Joseph Champ, and Lee Hood, published by Routledge in 2004.
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